Sunday, January 27, 2013

Twitter's Vine already seeing porn uploads

We'll see how Apple responds to this. Only a few days after Twitter unveiled Vine, its new video sharing app, it's become apparent, CNET reported on Sunday, that the new service has a porn problem.

Vine allows iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch users to create and share looping six-second clips. While not designed for it, considering the short length of the videos, Vine also has become a popular venue for male genitalia and pornographic movies taped off TVs and laptops. Searches for #porn, #sex, and other hashtags (or as France likes to call it instead of hashtag, "mot-di├Ęse") brings up videos featuring male body parts and other exhibitionist activity.

Vine's terms of service don't expressly forbid sexually explicit content. However, remember the App Store that Vine is in: Apple's. Apple has banned apps for less.

Apple even once banned Viddy, the 15-second-long video-sharing app, for similar explicit posts by its users. It later allowed Viddy back into the App Store.

Vine's Terms of Service don't explicitly say no explicit content (pun intended), but it does say:
You are responsible for your use of the Services, for any Content you post to the Services, and for any consequences thereof. The Content you submit, post, or display will be able to be viewed by other users of the Services and through third party services and websites. You should only provide Content that you are comfortable sharing with others under these Terms.
However, like other services, including the aforementioned Viddy, users can flag videos they find offensive. Viddy will remove such videos, and so will Twitter. A Twitter representative said:
Uploaded videos that are reported and determined to violate our guidelines will be removed from the site, and the user that posted the video may be terminated.
As an alternate response to complaints, Twitter may add a warning still to the beginning of the video that users have to bypass to see the clip.

Once again, though, Apple could ban the app if it so chooses. Apple's App Store guidelines state the following:
Apps containing pornographic material, defined by Webster's Dictionary as "explicit descriptions or displays of sexual organs or activities intended to stimulate erotic rather than aesthetic or emotional feelings," will be rejected.
Your move, Apple.



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