Thursday, December 02, 2010

Google to crack down on copyright infringers

Google is taking steps to reduce copyright infringement on sites that it can control. In addition, they are going to be more aggressive about booting folks from the AdSense program if they are found to violate copyright.

Here's what Google said in the blog post on their Public Policy blog.
  • We’ll act on reliable copyright takedown requests within 24 hours. We will build tools to improve the submission process to make it easier for rightsholders to submit DMCA takedown requests for Google products (starting with Blogger and web Search). And for copyright owners who use the tools responsibly, we’ll reduce our average response time to 24 hours or less. At the same time, we’ll improve our “counter-notice” tools for those who believe their content was wrongly removed and enable public searching of takedown requests.
    • We will prevent terms that are closely associated with piracy from appearing in Autocomplete. While it’s hard to know for sure when search terms are being used to find infringing content, we’ll do our best to prevent Autocomplete from displaying the terms most frequently used for that purpose.  This actually comes as after a recent story about just that: Google suggesting
    • things content providers probably wouldn't appreciate.
    • We will improve our AdSense anti-piracy review. We have always prohibited the use of our AdSense program on web pages that provide infringing materials. Building on our existing DMCA takedown procedures, we will be working with rightsholders to identify, and, when appropriate, expel violators from the AdSense program.
    • We will experiment to make authorised preview content more readily accessible in search results. Not surprisingly, we’re big fans of making authorised content more accessible on the Internet. Most users want to access legitimate content and are interested in sites that make that content available to them (even if only on a preview basis). We’ll be looking at ways to make this content easier to index and find.
    Of course, while it's interesting to note that Google will strive for a 24-hour turnaround for pulling down copyright-infringing material, it would be good to see the reverse as well. The company is very quick to pull stuff down, but pretty slow at putting it back up when it turns out to be non-infringing.

    Match.com


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